Although many organisations are increasingly recognising the value of diversity, 80% of the energy industry workforce is male, with very few women represented in executive leadership positions.

According to the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WMEA), women comprise 47.0% of all employed persons in Australia; 25.0% of all employed persons are women working full-time, and 21.9% are women working part-time.

While these statistics are improving all the time, the numbers get far leaner when considering leadership, directorships, board and CEO numbers - we are fortunate that AEMO’s own CEO Audrey Zibelman is part of a very exclusive club of female chief executives in the energy industry. 

Statistics show that when at least 30% of a company's leadership positions are filled by women, the company tends to report a 15% growth in profits.

Here at AEMO, we continue to encourage women to advance their careers in the energy sector. Our EGM of Strategy and Innovation, Jo Witters, presented at the Women in Energy and Resources Leadership Summit in Brisbane last month to support this position. 

“It’s great to see a focus on diversity in the workforce. Here at AEMO we are lucky to have a really diverse workforce – both in gender terms, but also culturally and in respect of our very broad range of capabilities and expertise,” said Jo.

“It was a great opportunity to talk to a group of engaged young professionals starting out in their careers and share a few of my own experiences with them all.”

The event encouraged women to seize new opportunities in today’s evolving workforce, and in a sector that has traditionally had less female representation, it was an opportunity to bring together energy leaders to engage in panel discussions. 

“The speaker line-up was impressive, to say the least, and it was inspiring to hear about their success stories,” said Neetika Kapani, Reserve Capacity Manager, who also attended the event. 

“While it’s important to encourage and support the development of women in a heavily male dominated industry like ours, I think it’s equally important for our male counterparts to attend and participate in some of these summits to get another perspective on leadership and what it entails.”

AEMO has also been involved in a number of similar initiatives, such as leading workshops for Power of Engineering across Australia to over 8,000 students. The not-for-profit organisation runs events for high school students, with a particular focus on female pupils, to demonstrate the range of opportunities available through careers in engineering and energy. This week, via Power of Engineering, we have organised for a group of 16 female high school students to visit our Norwest site in New South Wales as part of an industry tour. 

To find out more about working here at AEMO contact our Careers team and check out our Inside AEMO section where our employees have their say on what it’s like to be a part of the team.